Immunizations for you and your Family

At Avalon Pharmacy we have the CDC-recommended vaccines you need,

our pharmacist are certified to administer all the necessary immunizations for you and your family*. 

No appointment needed just walk-in for your convenience,

in between our hours: Monday-Friday from 9-5 pm
We are in network with many insurance companies, and many of the immunizations we administer are covered by insurance at little to no cost, if not covered or for those cash paying  we offer competitive prices, please call our pharmacy for more information.

SOME OF THE IMMUNIZATIONS AND VACCINES WE OFFER





Influenza

A contagious viral infection of the nose, throat, and lungs. Older adults and those with certain health conditions are at high risk for serious complications.

Influenza virus can cause a sudden high fever, chills, a dry cough, headache, runny nose, sore throat, and muscle and joint pain. Extreme fatigue can last from several days to weeks. Influenza may lead to hospitalization or even death.

There are two main types of influenza (flu) virus: Types A and B. The influenza A and B viruses that routinely spread in people (human influenza viruses) are responsible for seasonal flu epidemics each year.

The best way to prevent flu is by getting vaccinated each year.*

Hepatitis A
is an infection in the liver caused by hepatitis A virus. This disease is often spread through contaminated food.
Hepatitis A can cause fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). An infected person may have no symptoms, may have mild illness for a week or two, or may have severe illness for several months that requires hospitalization. To get the full benefit of the hepatitis A vaccine, more than one shot is needed. The number and timing of these shots depends on the type of vaccine you are given, typically 2 doses is needed for long-lasting protection. These doses should be given at least 6 months apart.*

Hepatitis b
is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The hepatitis B virus is transmitted when blood, semen, or another body fluid from a person infected with the virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen through sexual contact; sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment; or from mother to baby at birth. For some people, hepatitis B is an acute, or short-term, illness but for others, it can become a long-term, chronic infection. The best way to prevent hepatitis B is by getting vaccinated. The hepatitis B vaccine is safe and effective. Completing the series of shots is needed for full protection. The dosing schedule is 0, 1 to 2 months, and 4 to 6 months.*

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

is a common virus, especially among people in their teens and early 20s. Many people don’t know they have this for years until cancer appears.​ HPV is the major cause of cervical cancer in women, as well as anal cancer and genital warts in both women and men. Some types of HPV can cause cancers of the penis, anus, or oropharynx (back of the throat, including base of the tongue and tonsils).

A 3-dose schedule is recommended for people who get the first dose on or after their 15th birthday, and for people with certain immunocompromising conditions.

In a 3-dose series, the second dose should be given 1–2 months after the first dose, and the third dose should be given 6 months after the first dose (0, 1–2, 6 month schedule).*

Measles/Mumps/Rubella (M-M-R)

Measles is a very contagious disease caused by a virus. It spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Measles starts with a cough, runny nose, red eyes, and fever. Then a rash of tiny, red spots breaks out. It starts at the head and spreads to the rest of the body.

Mumps is an infectious disease caused by the mumps virus.

The mumps virus causes fever, headaches, painful swelling of the salivary glands under the jaw, fever, muscle aches, tiredness, and loss of appetite. Severe complications can include meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain and spinal cord), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), permanent hearing loss, or swelling of the testes, which can lead to sterility in men in rare cases.

Rubella is a viral disease that causes fever and rash.

Rubella usually causes a mild illness with fever, swollen glands, and a rash that lasts about 3 days. In some cases, it can lead to encephalitis (brain infection) in adults. If a pregnant woman is infected with rubella, it can result in miscarriage or serious birth defects such as mental retardation, heart defects, and loss of hearing and eye sight

These can be prevented with MMR vaccine. The vaccine protects against three diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella. CDC recommends children get two doses of MMR vaccine, starting with the first dose at 12 through 15 months of age, and the second dose at 4 through 6 years of age. Teens and adults should also be up to date on their MMR vaccination.

The MMR vaccine is very safe and effective. Two doses of MMR vaccine are about 97% effective at preventing measles; one dose is about 93% effective.*

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap)

is a very serious diseases. Tdap vaccine can protect us from these diseases. And, Tdap vaccine given to pregnant women can protect newborn babies against pertussis.

TETANUS (Lockjaw) is rare in the United States today. It causes painful muscle tightening and stiffness, usually all over the body.

It can lead to tightening of muscles in the head and neck so you can’t open your mouth, swallow, or sometimes even breathe. Tetanus kills about 1 out of 10 people who are infected even after receiving the best medical care.

DIPHTHERIA is also rare in the United States today. It can cause a thick coating to form in the back of the throat.

It can lead to breathing problems, heart failure, paralysis, and death.

PERTUSSIS (Whooping Cough) causes severe coughing spells, which can cause difficulty breathing, vomiting, and disturbed sleep.

It can also lead to weight loss, incontinence, and rib fractures. Up to 2 in 100 adolescents and 5 in 100 adults with pertussis are hospitalized or have complications, which could include pneumonia or death.

These diseases are caused by bacteria. Diphtheria and pertussis are spread from person to person through secretions from coughing or sneezing. Tetanus enters the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds.

A Td booster should be given every 10 years. Tdap may be given as one of these boosters if you have never gotten Tdap before. Tdap may also be given after a severe cut or burn to prevent tetanus infection. *



Chickenpox/Varicella

Chickenpox is a very contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It causes a blister-like rash, itching, tiredness, and fever. CDC recommends two doses of chickenpox vaccine for children, adolescents, and adults.

Two doses of the vaccine are about 90% effective at preventing chickenpox. When you get vaccinated, you protect yourself and others in your community. This is especially important for people who cannot get vaccinated, such as those with weakened immune systems or pregnant women.

Some people who are vaccinated against chickenpox may still get the disease. However, it is usually milder with fewer blisters and little or no fever. Talk with your healthcare professional if you have questions about chickenpox vaccine. *

Shingles

Shingles is a painful rash that usually develops on one side of the body, often the face or torso. The rash consists of blisters that typically scab over in 7 to 10 days and clears up within 2 to 4 weeks. Some people describe the pain as an intense burning sensation. For some people, the pain can last for months or even years after the rash goes away. This long-lasting pain is called postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and it is the most common complication of shingles. About 1 out of every 3 people in the United States will develop shingles, also known as herpes zoster, in their lifetime. Your risk of getting shingles and PHN increases as you get older.

Two vaccines are licensed and recommended to prevent shingles in the U.S.. Zoster vaccine live (ZVL, Zostavax) has been in use since 2006. Recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV, Shingrix), has been in use since 2017 and is recommended by ACIP as the preferred shingles vaccine.*

Meningococcal

Meningococcal disease refers to any illness caused by bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis, also known as meningococcus [muh-ning-goh-KOK-us]. These illnesses are often severe and can be deadly. They include infections of the lining of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) and bloodstream infections (bacteremia or septicemia).

These bacteria spread through the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions like spit (e.g., by living in close quarters, kissing). Doctors treat meningococcal disease with antibiotics, but quick medical attention is extremely important. Keeping up to date with recommended vaccines is the best defense against meningococcal disease. Signs and symptoms of meningococcal disease usually start suddenly and include fever, headache, and a stiff neck. It can start with symptoms similar to influenza (flu). Often people with meningococcal disease also have nausea, vomiting, increased sensitivity to light, rash, and confusion.*

Pneumococcal

vaccines help prevent pneumococcal disease, which is any type of illness caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria.

Besides pneumonia, pneumococcus can cause other types of infections too, such as:

Ear infections

Sinus infections

Meningitis (infection of the tissue covering the brain and spinal cord)

Bacteremia (bloodstream infection)

There are two kinds of pneumococcal vaccines available in the United States:

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine or PCV13

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine or PPSV23

CDC recommends PCV13 for all children younger than 2 years old and people 2 years or older with certain medical conditions. Adults 65 years or older also can discuss and decide, with their clinician, to get PCV13.

CDC recommends PPSV23 for all adults 65 years or older, people 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions, and adults 19 through 64 years old who smoke cigarettes.

Talk with your or your child’s clinician if you have questions about pneumococcal vaccines.*

Polio

Polio, or poliomyelitis, is a crippling and potentially deadly disease. It is caused by the poliovirus. The virus spreads from person to person and can invade an infected person’s brain and spinal cord, causing paralysis (can’t move parts of the body).

Polio can be prevented with vaccine. Inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is the only polio vaccine that has been given in the United States since 2000. It is given by shot in the arm or leg, depending on the person’s age.*

Typhoid Fever

If you are traveling to a country where typhoid (Salmonella serotype Typhi) is common, you should consider being vaccinated against typhoid. Visit a doctor or travel clinic to discuss your vaccination options.

Remember that you will need to complete your vaccination at least 1 week before you travel so that the vaccine has time to take effect. Typhoid vaccines lose effectiveness after several years; if you were vaccinated in the past, check with your doctor to see if it is time for a booster vaccination.*

Yellow Fever

​The yellow fever virus is found in tropical and subtropical areas of Africa and South America. The virus is spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. Yellow fever is a very rare cause of illness in U.S. travelers. Illness ranges from a fever with aches and pains to severe liver disease with bleeding and yellowing skin (jaundice). Yellow fever infection is diagnosed based on laboratory testing, a person’s symptoms, and travel history. There is no medicine to treat or cure infection. To prevent getting sick from yellow fever, use insect repellent, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants, and get vaccinated.

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